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3-5 Computer Science Curriculum (Blue - Level 2)
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TWENTY amazing lessons to teach computer science to Grades 3 to 5.
The curriculum is organized into 5 units: Scratch Review, Creative Commons, Makey Makey, Conditionals and Final Project.
If you need something easier be sure to use the Green level (Level 1) by using the tabs at the top of the website or finding it in the resource bank. If you need something harder head to Purple (Level 3) using the same method.

This fabulous resource has everything you need to get started coding and computer science with your students TODAY!

Subject:
Education
Educational Technology
Math
Coding
Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Computer Science team: CSinSF.org.
Date Added:
09/27/2018
3-5 Computer Science Curriculum (Purple - Level 3)
Conditions of Use:
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TWENTY amazing lessons to teach computer science to Grades 3 to 5.
The curriculum is organized into 5 units: Scratch review, variables, Makey Makey, advanced games and final project.
If you need something easier be sure to use the Green level (Level 1) or Blue level (Level 2) by using the tabs at the top of the website or finding it in the resource bank.

This fabulous resource has everything you need to get started coding and computer science with your students TODAY!

Subject:
Educational Technology
Math
Coding
Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Unit of Study
Author:
San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) Computer Science team: CSinSF.org.
Date Added:
09/27/2018
3D Graphics: Crash Course Computer Science #27
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Today we’re going to discuss how 3D graphics are created and then rendered for a 2D screen. From polygon count and meshes, to lighting and texturing, there are a lot of considerations in building the 3D objects we see in our movies and video games, but then displaying these 3D objects of a 2D surface adds an additional number of challenges. So we’ll talk about some of the reasons you see occasional glitches in your video games as well as the reason a dedicated graphics processing unit, or GPU, was needed to meet the increasing demand for more and more complex graphics.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Crashcourse
Date Added:
02/08/2019
Advanced CPU Designs: Crash Course Computer Science #9
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So now that we’ve built and programmed our very own CPU, we’re going to take a step back and look at how CPU speeds have rapidly increased from just a few cycles per second to gigahertz! Some of that improvement, of course, has come from faster and more efficient transistors, but a number hardware designs have been implemented to boost performance. And you’ve probably heard or read about a lot of these - they’re the buzz words attached to just about every new CPU release - terms like instruction pipelining, cache, FLOPS, superscalar, branch prediction, multi-core processors, and even super computers! These designs are pretty complicated, but the fundamental concepts behind them are not. So bear with us as we introduce a lot of new terminology including what might just be the best computer science term of all time: the dirty bit. Let us explain.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Crashcourse
Date Added:
02/08/2019
Alan Turing: Crash Course Computer Science #15
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Today we’re going to take a step back from programming and discuss the person who formulated many of the theoretical concepts that underlie modern computation - the father of computer science himself: Alan Turing. Now normally we try to avoid “Great Man" history in Crash Course because truthfully all milestones in humanity are much more complex than just an individual or through a single lens - but for Turing we are going to make an exception. From his theoretical Turing Machine and work on the Bombe to break Nazi Enigma codes during World War II, to his contributions in the field of Artificial Intelligence (before it was even called that), Alan Turing helped inspire the first generation of computer scientists - despite a life tragically cut short.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Crashcourse
Date Added:
02/08/2019
Android Acceleration Application
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In the first of two sequential lessons, students create mobile apps that collect data from an Android device's accelerometer and then store that data to a database. This lesson provides practice with MIT's App Inventor software and culminates with students writing their own apps for measuring acceleration. In the second lesson, students are given an app for an Android device, which measures acceleration. They investigate acceleration by collecting acceleration vs. time data using the accelerometer of a sliding Android device. Then they use the data to create velocity vs. time graphs and approximate the maximum velocity of the device.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Sandall
Scott Burns
Date Added:
09/18/2014
App Development with Swift - Canvas Commons
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Instructors can now freely access "App Development with Swift" through the Canvas Commons. The course includes lessons, teacher guides and developer tools for use in the classroom.
You will need to work with apple products or iOS for this resource.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Coding
Computer Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Canvas Commons
Swift
Date Added:
09/16/2019
<AppML> Tutorial
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AppML stands for Application Modeling Language.
AppML runs in any HTML page. No installation is required.
AppML is a tool for bringing data to HTML applications:

From objects
From files
From databases

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
w3schools
Date Added:
10/22/2019
Basic Computing Using Windows
Conditions of Use:
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A computer is an automatic, electronic, data-processing machine that takes in facts and figures known as data, and then processes or organizes it in some useful way. Afterwards it outputs, or displays, the results for you to see as information. Keep in mind that data is not information. Rather, information is the knowledge that you, the end-user, derive from accurate data that are entered into a computer. Only after processing, is data transformed into information which is then used for decision making. (Almost) each part of a computer can be classified as either hardware or software.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
04/09/2018
Blender 3D: Noob to Pro
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Blender 3D: Noob to Pro is a product of shared effort by numerous team members and anonymous editors. Its purpose is to teach people how to create three-dimensional computer graphics using Blender, a free software application. This book is intended to be used in conjunction with other on-line resources that complement it.

Subject:
Graphic Arts
Computer Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
04/09/2018
Boolean Logic & Logic Gates: Crash Course Computer Science #3
Rating

Today, Carrie Anne is going to take a look at how those transistors we talked about last episode can be used to perform complex actions. With the just two states, on and off, the flow of electricity can be used to perform a number of logical operations, which are guided by a branch of mathematics called Boolean Algebra. We’re going to focus on three fundamental operations - NOT, AND, and OR - and show how they were created in a series of really useful circuits. And its these simple electrical circuits that lay the groundwork for our much more complex machines.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Crashcourse
Date Added:
02/08/2019
Brain is a Computer
Conditions of Use:
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Students learn about the similarities between the human brain and its engineering counterpart, the computer. Since students work with computers routinely, this comparison strengthens their understanding of both how the brain works and how it parallels that of a computer. Students are also introduced to the "stimulus-sensor-coordinator-effector-response" framework for understanding human and robot actions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Charlie Franklin
Sachin Nair
Satish Nair
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Build Your Own Apps - Drag and Drop Mobile App Builder for iOS and Android
Rating

"Thunkable enables anyone to build their own beautiful mobile apps. Using drag and drop code, students can start from scratch or remix a sample app. Created app projects are accessible on both iOS and Android platforms. Thunkable has an active community with regular design challenges to keep students thinking outside the box with their app creations." (AASL)

"With the free version of Thunkable, all app projects are set to public mode. This means that all projects are automatically included in the Thunkable Public Gallery, for anyone to preview and remix. With a PRO membership, you have the ability to create and edit private projects. This means that no one else will have access to your apps." There are paid versions available as well.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Communication Studies
Media Studies
Math
Coding
Communication Media
Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Thunkable
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Build Your Own Arduino Light Sculpture! Part 2
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In the companion activity, students experimented with Arduino programming to blink a single LED. During this activity, students build on that experience as they learn about breadboards and how to hook up multiple LEDs and control them individually so that they can complete a variety of challenges to create fun patterns! To conclude, students apply the knowledge they have gained to create LED-based light sculptures.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Brian Huang
Date Added:
05/07/2018
C Programming
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C is the most commonly used programming language for writing operating systems. The first operating system written in C is Unix. Later operating systems like GNU/Linux were all written in C. Not only is C the language of operating systems, it is the precursor and inspiration for almost all of the most popular high-level languages available today. In fact, Perl, PHP, Python and Ruby are all written in C. By way of analogy, let's say that you were going to be learning Spanish, Italian, French, or Portuguese. Do you think knowing Latin would be helpful? Just as Latin was the basis of all of those languages, knowing C will enable you to understand and appreciate an entire family of programming languages built upon the traditions of C. Knowledge of C enables freedom.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
04/09/2018
C# Programming
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Although C# is derived from the C programming language, it introduces some unique and powerful features, such as delegates (which can be viewed as type-safe function pointers) and lambda expressions which introduce elements of functional programming languages, as well as a simpler single class inheritance model (than C++) and, for those of you with experience in "C-like" languages, a very familiar syntax that may help beginners become proficient faster than its predecessors. Similar to Java, it is object-oriented, comes with an extensive class library, and supports exception handling, multiple types of polymorphism, and separation of interfaces from implementations. Those features, combined with its powerful development tools, multi-platform support, and generics, make C# a good choice for many types of software development projects: rapid application development projects, projects implemented by individuals or large or small teams, Internet applications, and projects with strict reliability requirements. Testing frameworks such as NUnit make C# amenable to test-driven development and thus a good language for use with Extreme Programming (XP). Its strong typing helps to prevent many programming errors that are common in weakly typed languages.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
04/09/2018
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.11: Structuring Data
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In this lesson, students go further into the collection and interpretation of data, including cleaning and visualizing data. Students first look at the how presenting data in different ways can help people to understand it better, and they then create visualizations of their own data. Using a the results of a preferred pizza topping survey, students must decide what to do with data that does not easily fit into the visualization scheme that they have chosen. Finally, students look at which parts of this process can be automated by a computer and which need a human to make decisions.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Math
Coding
Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
10/11/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.12: Making Decisions with Data
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In this lesson students get practice making decisions with data based on some problems designed to be familiar to middle school students. Students work in groups discussing how they would use the data presented to make a decision before the class discusses their final choices. Not all questions have right answers and in some cases students can and should decide that they should collect more data. The lesson concludes with a discussion of how different people could draw different conclusions from the same data, or how collecting different data might have affected the decisions they made.

Subject:
Educational Technology
Math
Coding
Science
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
10/11/2019