Behaviour

This a collection of resources for teachers or parents looking for support for children with problematic behaviour. 

66 affiliated resources

Search Resources

View
Selected filters:
Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 1): Understanding the Acting-Out Cycle
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

The first in a two-part series, this Module discusses problem behavior in terms of the stages of the acting-out cycle and suggests ways to respond to students in the cycle's different phases (est. completion time: 1 hour). When you have completed this Module, be sure to learn more in part two.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 2): Behavioral Interventions
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

The second in a two-part series, this Module describes interventions that can increase initial compliance to teacher requests as well as interventions that can be implemented to decrease disruptive and noncompliant behaviors.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Adolescent development: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
Rating

This article has a ton of information on adolescent development such as physical development and their behavior. It gives statistics and shows the differences between boys and girls adolescent development. It also gives parenting advice about their kids sexuality and safety tips.

Subject:
Health Education
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Institutes of Health
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 1): An Overview for Educators
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This Module, first in a two-part series, provides information on the early signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as an overview of the difference between a medical diagnosis and an educational determination of ASD. Resources include notes on instructional considerations for teachers who have children and students with ASD in their classrooms, as well as things to keep in mind when working with the families of those children and students (est. completion time: 2 hours).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Autism Spectrum Disorder (Part 2): Evidence-Based Practices
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This Module, second in a two-part series, highlights strategies that have been shown to be effective in teaching appropriate behaviors and skills and decreasing inappropriate behaviors with children and youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It next explores several strategies that are particularly effective with young children, elementary and middle school students, and high school students (est. completion time: 3 hours).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Behaviour Supports for Teachers - PBISWorld.com Home Page
Rating

Select the student behaviour to begin. Then you will work through a series of descriptions and suggestions for what you can do to help that student.

You can look at interventions for Tier 1, Tier 2, Tier 3.

Each intervention suggested for a behaviour is then "clickable" and more information is provided on why to use this intervention, and how to do it.

This site is amazing!

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
PBISWorld
Date Added:
09/05/2019
Breaking the Attention-Seeking Habit: The Power of Random Positive Teacher Attention
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Some students misbehave because they are trying to attract teacher attention. Surprisingly, many students who value adult attention don't really care if it is positive (praise) or negative attention (reprimands)--they just want attention!
Unfortunately, instructors with students who thrive on teacher attention can easily fall into a 'reprimand trap.' The scenario might unfold much like this: First, the student misbehaves. Then the teacher approaches the student and reprimands him or her for misbehaving. Because the student finds the negative teacher attention to be reinforcing, he or she continues to misbehave-and the teacher naturally responds by reprimanding the student more often! An escalating, predictable cycle is established, with the student repeatedly acting-out and teacher reprimanding him or her.
Teachers can break out of this cycle, though, by using 'random positive attention' with students. Essentially, the instructor starts to ignore student attention-seeking behaviors, while at the same time 'randomly' giving the student positive attention. That is, the student receives regular positive teacher attention but at times unconnected to misbehavior. So the student still gets the adult attention that he or she craves. More importantly, the link between student misbehavior and resulting negative teacher attention is broken.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
05/21/2018
Build a Student Motivation Trap to Increase Academic Engagement
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Motivating a reluctant student to complete schoolwork is not easy. In a typical classroom, students can choose from a number of sources of potential reinforcement (Billington & DiTommaso, 2003)--and academic tasks often take a back seat to competing behaviors such as talking with peers. One way that teachers can increase the attractiveness of schoolwork is by structuring lessons or assignments around topics or activities of high interest to the student (Miller et al., 2003).In fact, with planning, the teacher can set up a 'trap' that uses motivating elements to capture a student's attention to complete academic tasks (Alber & Heward, 1996). Here is a 6-step blue-print for building an academic 'motivation trap' (adapted from Alber & Heward, 1996).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
05/21/2018
Building Body Acceptance (Body Dysmorphia) Self-Help Resources
Rating

Many people can have a poor body image, seeing their general physical appearance in a negative light (e.g., “I hate my body”). However, the term Body Dysmorphic Disorder, or BDD, is used to describe a particular more specific type of body image problem. BDD is marked by an intense preoccupation with a perceived flaw in one’s physical appearance. Individuals with BDD often spend significant periods of time worrying about and evaluating a particular aspect of their appearance. Large amounts of time may be spent checking their appearance in the mirror, comparing their appearance with others, and engaging in behaviours designed to try to hide or conceal the area of concern.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Primary Source
Date Added:
02/23/2019
Bully Proof Your Child: Become a Solution-Coach
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Nicholas Carlisle, Executive Director of No Bully, works with parents of Alvarado Elementary School in San Francisco, California, to share information about bullying and to devise and practice strategies for bully-proofing their children.Mr. Carlisle begins by defining the repetitive nature of bullying and looks specifically at four different kinds of bullying: physical, verbal, social/relational, and cyberbullying. Identifies best practices and preventative measures to help prevent bullying.Mr. Broecker, principal, tells parents about a group at the school focused on addressing the subject of bullying at school. He urges parents to join teachers and staff at Alvarado Elementary working with a group called PEACE (Practicing Empathy and Caring with Everyone).Addressing the larger question of how parents might bully-proof their children is the focus of much of the discussion. Mr. Carlisle asks parents to become a solution-coach, balancing both the use of empathy and setting limits and establishing consequences so that students are better prepared to deal with bullying in their lives.In small groups, parents practice what they have heard by discussing bullying scenarios and how they would help their child in specific bullying situations. This is followed by group discussion where parents share ideas for certain scenarios.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Calming the Agitated Student
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students can sometimes have emotional outbursts in school settings. This fact will not surprise many teachers, who have had repeated experience in responding to serious classroom episodes of student agitation. Such outbursts can be attributed in part to the relatively high incidence of mental health issues among children and youth. It is estimated, for example, that at least one in five students in American schools will experience a mental health disorder by adolescence (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). But even students not identified as having behavioral or emotional disorders may occasionally have episodes of agitation triggered by situational factors such as peer bullying, frustration over poor academic performance, stressful family relationships, or perceived mistreatment by educators.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
05/21/2018
Caring and Control Create a Safe, Positive Classroom
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Third grade teacher, Lori Sinclair, seeks the advice of instructional expert, Jim Knight, in an effort to improve classroom management and maximize student engagement.Lori and Jim analyze her daily procedures and routines and uncover three important takeaways that contribute to the positive culture of her classroom. A morning meeting helps Lori gauge studentsŐ state of mind and gives students an opportunity to ÔdecompressŐ before they focus on learning. Additional opportunities for student self-reflection also provide Ms. Sinclair with important information before proceeding with the lesson.Specific procedures and clear expectations, practiced consistently, contribute to smooth transitions, high student engagement and allow Lori to maximize her instructional minutes. All of this is tied together by a high ratio of positive to negative interactions that Lori purposely creates throughout the day. This positive feedback helps to create a safe environment and communicates expectations to students consistently.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Change Attitudes Toward Bullying: Be An Ally
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Over the course of four years, Longfellow Middle School has changed its message to students from ŇDont be a bully!Ó to ŇBe an ally!Ó in an effort to change student attitudes toward bullying. Activities during the month of October are aimed at changing the school climate incrementally, one student at a time.October kicks off an anti-bullying campaign that focuses on the positive behaviors exhibited by student allies in combating the difficult situation of bullying. An eighth grade leadership team conducts a workshop with classes throughout the school focusing on the different roles of bullies, allies and bystanders and how each contributes to a given situation. Using skits and small group discussions, students share experiences and brainstorm possible actions that will reduce or stop instances of bullying.When students are not comfortable intervening, they are encouraged to get help from an adult. In these instances, counselors conduct mediation with involved students and seek to define specific roles as allies instead of contributing to a given problem. Mediation is followed up by a written agreement and the counselor checks in with each student to monitor the situation.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This Module—a revision of Who's In Charge? Developing a Comprehensive Behavior Management System—highlights the importance of establishing a comprehensive classroom behavior management system composed of a statement of purpose, rules, procedures, consequences, and an action plan. It also provides information about how culture, classroom factors, and teacher actions can influence student behavior (est. completion time: 1 hour).

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Vanderbilt University
Provider Set:
IRIS Center
Date Added:
09/27/2018
Creating Rules and Rubrics to Prevent Bullying
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Based on data gathered from students, Saint Philips School has identified specific areas in which they need to improve their response to bullying among students. Working with the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, Saint Philips faculty created a rubric for their school defining types and levels of bullying and their associated consequences. During their Anti-Bully Kickoff day, teachers and students work together to define bullying and clearly establish expectations and consequences in an effort to prevent instances of bullying at the school. Activities include class meetings, posting and discussing rules and working in groups across grade levels to illustrate and discuss bullying and identify ways for students to support one another in addressing this important topic.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Cyberbullying: What's Crossing the Line?
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Middles school Social Studies teacher using contemporary issues to incorporate ELA CCSS into a lesson about cyberbullying. Students use factual information, a video and two case studies to consider and analyze different perspectives in specific cyberbullying incidents.Small group discussions allow students to both inform and support their opinions as they formulate ideas about the impact of the bullying and decisions resulting from particular incidents. Students grapple with different possibilities and consider the different perspectives of those involved in and affected by the bullying. Beginning first with students' ideas about bullying, Amy tries to find consensus in understanding when a line 'has been crossed' and actions become bullying. The class then watches a video to understand the impact that bullying has on one individual and discusses possible actions and outcomes for this situation. As students begin to grapple with different perspectives and ideas, they are asked to examine two case studies and answer questions that reflect multiple viewpoints about these two situations. Students reflect on the emotion involved when discussing bullying and recognize both the complexity and potential severity of the issue.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Diversity of Life
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this unit of study students learn about diversity of life by focusing on bats. They will learn about their habitat, structures and functions, and behaviors. This unit integrates nine STEM attributes and was developed as part of the South Metro-Salem STEM Partnership's Teacher Leadership Team. Any instructional materials are included within this unit of study.

Subject:
Math
Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
South Metro-Salem STEM Partnership
Author:
Sonia Lulay
Date Added:
05/24/2018
Dodging the Power-Struggle Trap: Ideas for Teachers
Read the Fine Print
Rating

he teacher's most important objective when faced with a defiant or non-compliant student is to remain outwardly calm. Educators who react to defiant behavior by becoming visibly angry, raising their voices, or attempting to intimidate the student may actually succeed only in making the student's oppositional behavior worse! While the strategies listed here may calm an oppositional student, their main purpose is to help the teacher to keep his or her cool. Remember: any conflict requires at least two people. A power struggle can be avoided if the instructor does not choose to take part in that struggle.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Intervention Central
Author:
Jim Wright
Date Added:
05/21/2018